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Cinnamomum verum (Cinnamon bark tree, Ceylon cinnamon)

[= Cinnamomum zeylanicum]

Life > eukaryotes > Archaeoplastida > Chloroplastida > Charophyta > Streptophytina > Plantae (land plants) > Tracheophyta (vascular plants) > Euphyllophyta > Lignophyta (woody plants) > Spermatophyta (seed plants) > Angiospermae (flowering plants) > magnoliids > Order: Laurales > Family: Lauraceae > Genus: Cinnamomum

This medium-sized tree is the source of true cinnamon and is native to Sri Lanka and India. The spice is derived from the bark and has a sweet, spicy flavour. It is used in puddings, confectionery, mulled wine, sauces, red meat dishes, chicken dishes, pickles and soups. The flavour is mainly due to cinnamaldehyde, which is the main component in the essential oil derived from cinnamon.

This medium-sized tree is the source of true cinnamon and is native to Sri Lanka and India. It is cultivated widely in tropical countries around the world. The spice is derived from the bark, which is harvested from the cultivated trees every two years. Cinnamon spice has a sweet, spicy flavour and is used in puddings, confectionery, mulled wine, sauces, red meat dishes, chicken dishes, pickles and soups. The flavour is mainly due to cinnamaldehyde, which is the main component in the essential oil derived from cinnamon.

The bark of Cinnamomum aromaticum (Chinese cinnamon, cassia) is also used as a spice and in fact has a stronger flavour than real cinnamon.

Publications

  • van Wyk, B.-E. 2005. Food Plants of the World - Identification, Culinary Uses and Nutritional Value. Briza, Pretoria.

 

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