Psittacula krameri (Rose-ringed parakeet) 

Ringnekparkiet [Afrikaans]; Halsbandparkiet [Dutch]; Perruche collier [French]; Halsbandsittich [German]; Periquito-de-colar [Portuguese]

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Psittacula krameri (Rose-ringed parakeet)   

Rose-ringed parakeets, Amsterdam, Holland. [photo Hamish Robertson, Iziko ]

 

The Rose-ringed parakeet is not indigenous to southern Africa, but is rather and introduced species, with feral populations centred around Durban and Johannesburg. It occurs in a wide variety of habitats, ranging from savanna to riparian woodland, however it is most common in parks, gardens, farmland and other man-made habitats. It is highly sociable and gregarious, feeding mainly on fruit and seeds. It nests in tree cavities, either natural or made by barbets, but also uses rock crevices, buildings and nest boxes. Here it usually lays 3-4 eggs which are incubated mainly by the female, for about 28 days. The chicks stay in the nest for about 6-7 weeks, becoming fully independent a few months later.

Distribution and habitat

Not indigenous to southern Africa, as instead it is introduced species, with feral populations centred around Durban, KwaZulu-Natal and Johannesburg, Gauteng. It is indigenous to the Sahel area, from Senegal to Ethiopia, with other populations in southern Asia. It occurs in a wide variety of habitats, ranging from savanna to riparian woodland, however it is most common in parks, gardens, farmland and other man-made habitats.

Food 

The following food items have been recorded in its diet:

  • Plants
    • fruit
      • Ficus (figs)
      • alien species
        • Mangifera indica (Mango)
        • Syzigium cumini (Jambolan Plum)
        • Livistona chinensis (Chinese fan-palm)
        • Litchi chinensis (Litchi)
        • Pleiogynium cerasiferum (Dutch Apples)
    • seeds
      • Eucalyptus
      • Araucaria heterophylla (Norfolk pine)
      • Erythrina (coral-trees)
  • Insect larvae (rarely)

Breeding

  • Its breeding habits are little known in South Africa.
  • It nests in tree cavities, either natural or made by barbets, but it may also use rock crevices, buildings and nest boxes.
  • It usually lays 3-4 eggs, which are incubated mainly by the female for about 28 days.
  • The chicks stay in the nest for about 6-7 weeks, becoming fully independent a few months later.

Threats

As it is an alien species it requires no conservation, however internationally it is common and not threatened.

References

  • Hockey PAR, Dean WRJ and Ryan PG (eds) 2005. Roberts - Birds of southern Africa, VIIth ed. The Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town. 

 
 

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