Euplectes capensis (Yellow bishop, Cape Bishop, Cape Widow, Yellow-rumped widow) 

Kaapse flap [Afrikaans]; Isahomba, Isakhomba (terms applied to Fan-tailed widowbird) [Xhosa]; Enzunge (applied to some of the bishops, widows and sparrows) [Kwangali]; Thaha (generic term for bishops and queleas) [South Sotho]; Mantunje, Xikhungumala [Tsonga]; Fluweelwidavink [Dutch]; Euplecte à croupion jaune [French]; Samtweber [German]; Cardeal-tecelão-de-rabadilha-amarela [Portuguese]

Life > Eukaryotes > Opisthokonta > Metazoa (animals) > Bilateria > Deuterostomia > Chordata > Craniata > Vertebrata (vertebrates)  > Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates) > Teleostomi (teleost fish) > Osteichthyes (bony fish) > Class: Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish) > Stegocephalia (terrestrial vertebrates) > Tetrapoda (four-legged vertebrates) > Reptiliomorpha > Amniota > Reptilia (reptiles) > Romeriida > Diapsida > Archosauromorpha > Archosauria > Dinosauria (dinosaurs) > Saurischia > Theropoda (bipedal predatory dinosaurs) > Coelurosauria > Maniraptora > Aves (birds) > Order: Passeriformes > Family: Ploceidae > Genus: Euplectes

Euplectes capensis (Yellow bishop, Cape Bishop, Cape Widow, Yellow-rumped widow)  Euplectes capensis (Yellow bishop, Cape Bishop, Cape Widow, Yellow-rumped widow) 

Yellow bishop male, De Hoop Nature Reserve. [photo Raghnild and Neil Crawford ©]

Yellow bishop male, Klipheuwel Farmlands, South Africa. [photo Trevor Hardaker ©]

Euplectes capensis (Yellow bishop, Cape Bishop, Cape Widow, Yellow-rumped widow)  Euplectes capensis (Yellow bishop, Cape Bishop, Cape Widow, Yellow-rumped widow) 
Yellow bishop male, Helderberg Nature Reserve, South Africa. [photo Trevor Hardaker ©] Yellow bishop female, Rondevlei Bird Sanctuary, South Africa
. [photo Trevor Hardaker ©]

Distribution and habitat

Although it occurs in areas of Ethiopia and Nigeria, the bulk of its population extends from Uganda and southern DRC though Tanzania, Angola and Zambia to southern Africa. Here it is fairly common in north-central Mozambique, Zimbabwe and in South Africa along the Escarpment, through Lesotho and the Eastern Cape to the Western Cape. It occupies a wide array of habitats, including fynbos, cultivated land, dense vegetation along streams, forest edges and montane grassland.

Distribution of Yellow bishop in southern Africa, based on statistical smoothing of the records from first SA Bird Atlas Project (© Animal Demography unit, University of Cape Town; smoothing by Birgit Erni and Francesca Little). Colours range from dark blue (most common) through to yellow (least common). See here for the latest distribution from the SABAP2.  

Predators and parasites

It has been recorded as prey of the following animals:

Food 

It eats seeds supplemented with insects, doing most of its foraging on the ground and in patches of grass. The following food items have been recorded in its diet:

Breeding

  • Polygynous solitary nester, as it may mate with at least 3-4 females in a breeding season, defending his territory with multiple nests against intruders, such as other Euplectes species.
  • The male builds the nest, which is a domed structure with a side entrance, made of woven strips of grass and lined by the female with grass seed heads, which may project out of the entrance to form an untidy hood. It is typically concealed in a dense grass tuft or shrub, the leaves of which are often incorporated into the nest.
  • Egg-laying season is mainly from December-April in summer rainfall areas, and from August-October in places with winter rainfall.
  • It lays 2-4 eggs, which are incubated solely by the female for about 15-16 days.
  • The chicks are fed by the female only, leaving the nest after about 16-20 days.

Threats

Not threatened.

References

  • Hockey PAR, Dean WRJ and Ryan PG 2005. Roberts - Birds of southern Africa, VIIth ed. The Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town. 

 

 

 

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