Tauraco corythaix (Knysna turaco, Knysna lourie) 

Knysnaloerie [Afrikaans]; Igolomi [Xhosa]; iGwalagwala (also applied to Purple-crested and Livingstone's turacos) [Zulu]; Hurukuru [Shona]; Ntlume, Tlulutlulu [Tsonga]; Touraco louri [French]; Helmturako [German]; Turaco de Knysna [Portuguese]

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Tauraco corythaix (Knysna turaco, Knysna lourie) 
Knysna turaco feeding on fruit of Acokanthera oppositifolia (Common poison-bush), Tsitskamma National Park, South Africa. [photo Duncan Robertson ] Knysna turaco, Nature's Valley. [photo H. Robertson, Iziko ]
   

The Knysna turaco is endemic to South Africa and Swaziland, with most of its population concentrated in coastal Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal, occurring in Afromontane forest and riverine forest in fynbos. It feeds mainly on fruit, with seeds and invertebrates making up the rest of its diet. The nest is built by both sexes, and is a flimsy platform of twigs, placed in thick tangles of leaves. It lays 1-2 eggs, which are incubated by both sexes, for 20-24 days. The chicks stay in the nest for about 22 days, after which they clamber around the surrounding branches. They attempt their first flight at about 28 days old, becoming independent a few week after this.

Distribution and habitat

Endemic to South Africa and Swaziland, occurring from Limpopo Province to KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape, marginally extending into the Western Cape. It generally prefers Afromontane forest and riverine forest in fynbos.

Call

 
   

Recorded by A. Manson, Vumba, Zimbabwe, [ Transvaal Museum]

 

Food 

It feeds mainly on fruit, supplemented with seeds and invertebrates. It does most of its foraging in the canopy of trees, sometimes descending to fruiting bushes and shrubs. The following food items have been recorded in its diet:

Breeding

  • The nest is built by both sexes, with one collecting material and then giving it to the other, who then puts it into the nest. It consists of a flimsy platform of interlacing twigs, typically placed 3-9 m above ground in a tangle of leaves, either in the outer branches of trees or in creepers.
  • Egg-laying season is roughly from May-February.
  • It lays 1-2 eggs, which are incubated by both sexes for 20-24 days.
  • The chicks stay in the nest for about 22 days, after which they clamber around the surrounding branches. They attempt their first flight at about 28 days old, becoming independent soon afterwards.

Threats

Not threatened, although its population is locally impacted by deforestation.

References

  • Hockey PAR, Dean WRJ and Ryan PG 2005. Roberts - Birds of southern Africa, VIIth ed. The Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town. 

 

 

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