Turtur afer (Blue-spotted wood-dove, Blue-spotted dove) 

Blouvlekduifie [Afrikaans]; Staalvlekduif [Dutch]; Tourtelette améthystine [French]; Stahlflecktaube [German]; Rola-de-manchas-azuis [Portuguese]

Life > Eukaryotes > Opisthokonta > Metazoa (animals) > Bilateria > Deuterostomia > Chordata > Craniata > Vertebrata (vertebrates)  > Gnathostomata (jawed vertebrates) > Teleostomi (teleost fish) > Osteichthyes (bony fish) > Class: Sarcopterygii (lobe-finned fish) > Stegocephalia (terrestrial vertebrates) > Tetrapoda (four-legged vertebrates) > Reptiliomorpha > Amniota > Reptilia (reptiles) > Romeriida > Diapsida > Archosauromorpha > Archosauria > Dinosauria (dinosaurs) > Saurischia > Theropoda (bipedal predatory dinosaurs) > Coelurosauria > Maniraptora > Aves (birds) > Order: Columbiformes > Family: Columbidae > Genus: Turtur

Turtur afer (Blue-spotted wood-dove, Blue-spotted dove)   

Blue-spotted wood-dove, Gambia. [photo Martin Goodey ©]

 

The Blue-spotted wood-dove occurs across sub-Saharan Africa, absent from large areas of east-central and southern Africa. It usually occurs on the edges of evergreen or gallery forest, occasionally moving into the surrounding bush. Its diet has not been properly studied, however it is probably omnivorous, foraging mainly on the ground. The nest is a fragile saucer, made up of twigs, petioles and rootlets, usually placed on a leafy stump, tree or bush. Here it lays about 2 eggs, which are incubated for about 15-17 days. The chicks stay in the nest for roughly 15-18 days (recorded in captivity).

Distribution and habitat

Occurs across sub-Saharan Africa, absent from parts of Tanzania, Kenya and Somalia. In southern Africa it is confined to north-central Mozambique bordering on eastern Zimbabwe, with one or two localized populations in Limpopo Province. It usually occurs on the edge of evergreen or gallery forest, occasionally moving into the surrounding bush.

Distribution of Blue-spotted wood-dove in southern Africa, based on statistical smoothing of the records from first SA Bird Atlas Project (© Animal Demography unit, University of Cape Town; smoothing by Birgit Erni and Francesca Little). Colours range from dark blue (most common) through to yellow (least common). See here for the latest distribution from the SABAP2.  

Food 

Its diet has not been properly studied, however it is probably omnivorous, foraging mainly on the ground.

Breeding

  • Its breeding habits are little known, but it is presumed to be a monogamous, solitary nester.
  • The nest is a fragile sauce of twigs, petioles and rootlets, typically placed on a leafy stump, tree or bush.
  • Egg-laying season is from about April-December, peaking from September-October.
  • It lays about two eggs, which are incubated for about 15-17 days.
  • The chicks stay in the nest for roughly 15-18 days (recorded in captivity).

Threats

Not threatened.

References

  • Hockey PAR, Dean WRJ and Ryan PG 2005. Roberts - Birds of southern Africa, VIIth ed. The Trustees of the John Voelcker Bird Book Fund, Cape Town. 

 

 
 

 Contact us if you can contribute information or images to improve this page.

Birds home   Biodiversity Explorer home   Iziko home   Search